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IS 2164 (1961) : Method for calculation of bulk quantities 
of petroleum and liquid petroleum products [PCD 1: Methods 
of Measurement and Test for Petroleum, Petroleum Products 
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IS : 2164 -1961 

( Reaffirmed 2002 ) 



Indian Standard 

METHOD FOR CALCULATION OF BULK 

QUANTITIES OF PETROLEUM AND 

LIQUID PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 

( Fourth Reprint OCTOBER 1997 ) 



UDC 665.5 : 531.732 



© Copyright 1962 
BUREAU OF INDIAN STANDARDS 

MANAK BHAVAN, 9 BAHADUR SHAH ZAFAR MARG 
NEW DELHI 110002 



Gr 7 November 1962 



IS: 2164- 1961 

Indian Standard 

METHOD FOR CALCULATION OF BULK 

QUANTITIES OF PETROLEUM AND 

LIQUID PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 

Petroleum Measurements Sectional Committee, CDC 32 

Chairman Representing 

Dr H. K. Joski Esse Standard Refining Co of India Ltd, 

Bombay 

Members 
Shri T. B. Bhonsle Central Public Works Department 

Executive Engineer ( Alternate ) 
Shri E. M. Bhumgara Caltex (India) Ltd, Bombay; and Caltex Oil 

Refining ( India ) Ltd, Visakhapatnam 
Shri V. H. Khakhar Caltex ( India ) Ltd, Bombay 

( Alternate ) 
Shri N. S. Rao ( Alternate ) Caltex Oil Refining ( India ) Ltd, Visakhapatnam 

Shri JK. V. Bole Ministry of Finance ( Revenue Division ) 

Director CSIR ( Indian Institute of Petroleum, Dehra 

Dun) 
Shri K. B. Ganesan Directorate General of Civil Aviation ( Ministry 

of Transport & Communications ) 
Shri S. G. Ghoshalkar Railway Board ( Ministry of Railways ) 

Shri S. B. J. Rajaiah ( Alternate ) 
Shri J. M. Guha Department of Mines & Fuel { Ministry of Mines & 

Fuel ) 
Shri A. S. Krishnaswamy Indian Oil Co Ltd, Bombay 

Shri V. D. Bapat ( Alternate ) 
Shri S. D. Mehta Indian Refineries Ltd, New Delhi 

Shri S. S. Pandit ( Alternate } 
Shri N. A. Mendes Indo-Burma Petroleum Co, Bombay 

Shri R. M. Chari ( Alternate ) 
Shri S. N. Nakhate Esso Standard Eastern, Inc, Bombay 

Shri A. N. Nandy Ministry of Defence (R&D) 

Shri D. M. Banerjee ( Alternate ) 
Shri K, Srinivasa Rao Standing Metric Committee, Ministry of Commerce 

& Industry 
Shri T. R. Rao Burmah-Shell Oil Storage & Distributing Co of 

India Ltd, Bombay 
Shri A. S. Vaidya ( Alternate ) 
Shri K. K. Roy Western India Oil Distributing Co Ltd, Bombay 



Shri M. C. Desai ( Alternate ) 



( Continued on page 2 ) 



BUREAU OF INDIAN STANDARDS 

MANAK BHAVAN, 9 BAHADUR SHAH ZAFAR MARG 
NEW DELHI 110002 



IS: 2164- 1361 

( Continued from page 1 ) 

Members Representing 

Dr B. S. Subrahmanyam Assam Oil Co Ltd, Digboi 

Shri H. D. Suri Ministry of Finance ( Revenue Division ) 

Shri Manohar Lal ( Alternate ) 
Maj Swaran Singh Directorate of Supply & Transport, Quartermaster 

General's Branch, Army Headquarters 
Capt A. K. Pandya ( Alternate ) 
Dr Sadgopal, Director, BIS ( Ex-officio Member ) 

Deputy Director ( Chem ) 

Secretary 

Shri D. Das Gupta 

Assistant Director (Chem ),BIS 

Gauging of Tanks and Calculation of Bulk Quantities of Oils in Tanks 
( Other Than Pressure Vessels ) Subcommittee, GDC 32 : 3 

Convener 

Shri T.R.Rao Burmah-Shell Oil Storage & Distributing Co of 

India Ltd, Bombay 

Members 

Shri A. S. Vaidya ( Alternate to 
Shri T. R. Rao ) 
Shri A. S. Krishnaswamy Indian Oil Co Ltd, Bombay 

Shri V. D. Bapat ( Alternate ) 
Shri S. N. Nakhate Esso Standard Eastern, Inc, Bombay 

Dr B. S. Subrahmanyam Assam Oil Co Ltd, Digboi 

Shri H. D. Suri Ministry of Finance ( Revenue Division ) 

Shri Manohar Lal ( Alternate ) 



IS : 2164 - 1961 

Indian Standard 

METHOD FOR CALCULATION OF BULK 

QUANTITIES OF PETROLEUM AND 

LIQUID PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 

0. FOREWORD 

0.1 This Indian Standard was adopted by the Indian Standards Institu- 
tion on 20 June 1961, after the draft finalized by the Petroleum Measure- 
ments Sectional Committee had been approved by the Chemical Division 
Council. 

0.2 The Indian Standards on tank calibration, gauging, sampling, 
temperature measurement and determination of density have laid down 
procedures which, when followed, allow the volume, temperature and 
density of a bulk quantity of oil to be determined with considerable 
precision. The care with which these physical measurements have been 
made will be largely nullified if the subsequent calculations are carried out 
inaccurately or incorrectly. The quantity calculated will be substantially 
correct if: 

a) The accepted* volume is substantially correct. This implies that: 

1 ) the container has been accurately calibrated and its Calibra- 
tion Table correctly computed by recognized methods. For 
vertical and horizontal tanks, the recommendations laid down 
in the following standards shall apply: 

IS : 2007-1961 Method for Calibration of Vertical Oil 

Storage Tanks 
IS : 2008-1961 Method for Computation of Capacity 

Tables for Vertical Oil Storage Tanks 
IS: 2009-1961 Method for Calibration of Horizontal 

and Tilted Oil Storage Tanks 
IS: 2166-1963 Method for Computation of Cap\city 

Tables for Horizontal and Tilted Oil Storage Tanks 

2) the oil depth has been correctly measured and recorded by the 
methods laid down in IS : 1518-1960 Method for Gauging of 
Petroleum and Liquid Petroleum Products; 

b) The container has been correctly sampled in accordance with 
IS: 1447-1966 Methods of Sampling of Petroleum and Its 
Products; 

* ' Accepted ' means the ' figure taken into further calculation \ 



IS: 2164 -1961 

c) The accepted oil temperature is substantially correct and has been 
obtained in accordance with the recommendations laid down in 
IS : 1519 ( Part I )-1961 Method for Temperature Measurement 
of Petroleum and Its Products, Part I; and 

d) All densities have been determined in accordance with the 
method for determination of density laid down in P;16 of 
IS : 1448 ( Part I )-l960 Methods of Test for Petroleum and Its 
Products, Part I. 

0.3 The methods of calculation given in this standard have, therefore, 
been drawn up to give the maximum possible accuracy in the final 
calculated quantities compatible with the precision of the physical 
measurements. 

0.3.1 For large quantities, namely, supplies made by tanker, pipeline, 
transfer from a shore tank into a ship, barges, etc, it is essential that the 
methods specified in this standard shall be used for accurate assessment. 
However, for small quantities, namely, supplies made in barrels, tank 
lorries and rail tank wagons of which a very large number of despatches 
are made daily, a short method has been given in Appendix A. This 
simpler method would save time in calculation and would be sufficiently 
accurate for purposes of billing. 

0.4 Wherever a reference to any Indian Standard appears in this 
standard, it shall be taken as a reference to the latest version of the 
standard. 

0.5 In reporting the result of a calculation made in accordance with this 
standard, if the final value, observed or calculated, is to be rounded off, it 
shall be done in accordance with IS: 2-1960 Rules for Rounding Off 
Numerical Values ( Revised ). 



1. SCOPE 

1.1 This standard prescribes method of calculations, normal and special, 
of bulk quantities of petroleum and liquid petroleum products. 

1.1.1 The normal method shall apply to all liquid petroleum products in 
bulk except those listed in 1.1.2. 

1.1.2 The special method of calculations, which is a modification of the 
normal method of calculations, will usually be necessary if the product 
concerned is: 

a) a liquid under high pressure (propane, butane, etc ); 

b) a volatile liquid in vapour-tight storage; 



IS: 2164- 1961 

c) a liquid contained in a pipeline; 

d) a liquid stored in a tank subject to bottom movement; or 

e) a liquid stored in a floating roof tank. 

2. TERMINOLOGY 

2.1 For the purpose of this standard, the following definitions shall 
apply: 

Accepted Temperature — Is the temperature reading which is 
taken into further calculation, the temperature being measured as 
prescribed in IS : 1519 (Part I )-1961 Method for Temperature 
Measurement of Petroleum and Its Products, Part I. However, if 
the initial and final temperatures of the oil before and after the 
movement of oil are different, the accepted temperature shall be the 
weighted average of these two temperatures, the weights being based 
on the estimated volumes of oil before and after its movement. 

Algebraic Sum — Of a number of quantities is their sum, 
having due regard to the signs of these quantities. For example, if 
any containers A, B and C are receiving oil and, at the same time, 
the container C is making a transfer. And if the containers A, B and 
C have received a quantity X> X and £, respectively, of oil and at 
the same time container C has delivered a quantity X u then the net 
change in the quantity of oil in the containers is X + T -f £ — Xy. 

Gross Measured Volume — Is the total volume of material in 
a container for a given dip or gauge and at the observed tempera- * 
ture at the time of gauging. 

Net Measured Volume — Is the gross measured volume at the 
accepted temperature after deducting any free water and sediment 
which may be present. 

Net Quantity Received or Delivered — Is the difference 
between the net volume or net weight of clean oil, before and after 
the oil movement for each container under consideration. 

Net Volume of Clean Oil at the Accepted Temperature — 

Is the net measured volume of oil at the accepted temperature, less 
the quantity of any water and sediment in suspension in the oil. 

Net Volume of Clean Oil at Standard Reference Tempera- 
ture — Is the net measured volume of oil, reduced to standard 
reference temperature of 15°C by means of the appropriate 
ASTM/IP Volume Reduction Table, less the quantity of any water 
and sediment in suspension in the oil. 



IS : 2164 - 1961 

Standard Reference Temperature — 15°C. 

Weight of Net Clean Oil — Is the weight in air of the net 

volume of clean oil at standard reference temperature. 

SECTION I METHODS FOR NORMAL CALCULATIONS 

3. GENERAL 

3.1 The final quantity of oil may be required in terms of weight in air, 
volume at standard reference temperature, or for some purposes, volume 
at the accepted temperature. All these requirements involve a know- 
ledge of the volume of oil in a container. 

3.2 When several containers are involved, the quantity of oil in each 
container shall be separately calculated and the final quantity shall be 
recorded by adding the separate quantities so obtained by following the 
procedures laid down in this standard. For the purpose of measurement, 
a pipeline is considered as a separate container and all appropriate pipe- 
lines shall, therefore, be taken into consideration. Pipelines do not lend 
themselves to simple methods of measurements and are most conveniently 
dealt with either completely empty or completely full, although with full 
pipelines some correction for difference in temperature before and after an 
oil movement, may be necessary. Pipelines are dealt with separately in 
Section II. 

4. INTERPRETATION OF REPORTED MEASUREMENTS 

4.1 Measurements Reported — Gauging reports shall give all relevant 
details of tank number or numbers, the position and number of dip 
hatches, product, date and time, etc. The gauger's note shall, in addition, 
contain the following information: 

a) Dip or Ullage ( With Height of Reference Point Above the Datum 
Point ) — The dip or ullage shall be taken as prescribed in 
IS: 1518-1960 Method for Gauging of Petroleum and Liquid 
Petroleum Products, from the dip hatch specified on the tank 
calibration table, except as described in 10.2. 

b) Temperature — It shall be middle or the average of upper, middle 
and lower temperatures as prescribed in IS : 1519 ( Part I )-1961 
Method for Temperature Measurement of Petroleum and Its 
Products, Part I. In exceptional cases, namely, heated oils, 
temperature of samples drawn from other levels and from more 
than one dip hatch may be reported. 

c) Water Dips — Water dips shall be taken as prescribed in 
IS: 1518-1960 Method for Gauging of Petroleum and Liquid 



IS : 2164 - 1961 

Petroleum Products, from the dip hatch specified in the tank 
calibration table but where incomplete water bottoms are encoun- 
tered, dips will be reported from more than one dip hatch if 
the tank is so fitted. 

d) Sludge — If sludge is present at the bottom of the tank the 
gauger may report this by an ullage measurement or by a 
measurement in accordance with appropriate Indian Standard 
when published. 

4.2 In addition to the above, the following information will be 
required: 

a) Density of the contents of each container, and 

b) Percentage of water or sediment in suspension in the product. 

4.3 Preliminary Calculations — Before the final calculations of oil 
quantities can be commenced, it may be necessary to adjust the reported 
measurements in order to obtain correct ( * true ' ) figures, namely, the 
determination of true dip or ullage. 

4.3.1 Determination of True Dip or Ullage — The true dip or ullage is that 
taken from the dip hatch specified on the tank calibration table and will be 
the dip or ullage normally reported. Exceptions to this are: 

a) when tank bottom movement is suspected. The method of 
calculating oil volume in these circumstances is treated separately 
in 10.2. 

b) where the dip or ullage reported from the dip hatch specified on 
the tank calibration table shows that the oil level is below 
the level ,of the first entry in the tank calibration table the volume 
of oil shall be determined as specified in 10.1. 

4.3.2 Determination of Average Dip — The average dip, where required, 
shall be determined by the following procedure: 

a) If the tank is fitted with a central dip hatch and a number 
of peripheral dip hatches, first compute the arithmetic means 
of the dips at the central dip hatch and at each peripheral 
dip hatch taken in pairs. The average dip for the tank is then the 
sum of these arithmetic means divided by the number of 
arithmetic means so computed. 

b) If the tank is fitted with a central dip hatch, n peripheral dip 
hatches and n intermediate hatches situated midway between the 
centre and the periphery of the tank, the average dip is 

^— ( n X central dip + the sum of all the non-central dips ). 



IS: 2164 -1961 

c) If the tank is fitted with the peripheral dip hatches only, the 
average dip of the tank is the arithmetic mean of the dips at ail dip 
hatches. 

d) In all other cases make the best possible estimate of the average 
dip of the tank from the dips at all dip hatches, making due 
allowance for the relative positions of the dip hatches. 

4.3.3 Determination of True Water Dip — The true water dip is that taken 
from the dip hatch specified on tank calibration table, and will be 
the water dip normally reported. Exceptions to this are: 

a) when tank bottom movement is suspected. The method of 
calculating water volumes in these circumstances is treated 
separately in 10.2, and 

b) where the water dip reported shows that the water level is 
below the level of the first entry in the tank calibration table, the 
volume of water shall be determined as specified in 10.1. 

4.3.4 Determination of the True Quantity of Sludge or Sediment at the 
Bottom of a Tank — When the level of sludge or sediment at the bottom of a 
tank has been determined by ullage measured at the dip hatch specified on 
the tank calibration table, the level so reported will normally be the level at 
which the tank calibration table will be entered to obtain the true quantity 
of sludge or sediment at the bottom of the tank. 

If, however, the level so reported is below the level of the first entry 
in the tank calibration table, then the levels of sludge or sediment shall 
be measured from all the dip hatches fitted to the tank and an 
average of these levels obtained by the procedure specified in 4.3.2. The 
volume of sludge or sediment represented by this average shall be determin- 
ed as specified in 10.1. 

4.3.5 Determination of Accepted Temperature — The accepted tempera ture of 
the oil in a tank shall be the middle temperature of the oil in the 
tank or average of the upper, middle and lower temperatures, as the 
case may be. 

4.3.6 Determination of Accepted Density — The accepted density of the oil 
in a tank shall be the density determined on a composite sample prepared 
in accordance with 18:1447-1966 Methods of Sampling of Petroleum 
and Its Products. 

4.3.7 Determination of True Percentage of Water and Sediment in Suspen- 
sion — Where percentages of water and sediment in suspension 
have been reported on more than one sample, the true percentage of water 
and sediment in suspension shall be determined by calculating the average 
percentage, due allowance being given to the approximate quantity of oil 
represented by each sample on which the percentage has been determined. 

8 



IS : 2164 - 1961 

5. CALCULATION OF VOLUME AT THE ACCEPTED 
TEMPERATURE 

5.1 Gross Measured Volume Before Movement 

5.1.1 Obtain from the calibration table for the tank the volume corres- 
ponding to the true dip ( see 4.3.1 ) interpolating or using the proportional 
parts table where this is available, if necessary. 

5.1.2 Where ullages are given and the calibration table for the tank has 
been compiled on an oil depth basis, first convert the ullage to equivalent 
dip by deducting the ullage from the known distance between the ullage 
reference point and the dipping datum point. 

5.1.3 Where ullages are given and if the tank calibration table is 
compiled on the ullage basis, proceed as in 5.1.1. 

5.2 Volume of Water, Sludge and Sediment 

5.2.1 Obtain from the calibration table for the tank, the volume of free 
water and sediment corresponding to the true water dip before the oil 
movement, interpolating or using the proportional parts table where this 
is available, if necessary. 

5.2.2 Where water and /or sediment measurements are given as ullages 
and the tank calibration table has been compiled on an oil depth basis, 
convert the ullages to equivalent dips as in 5.1.2 before entering the tank 
calibration table. 

5.2.3 Where the tank calibration table is entered against ullage, convert 
the true water dip to equivalent ullage by procedure implied in 5.1.2. 

5.2.4 Where water and /or sediment are given as ullages and the tank 
calibration table has been compiled on an ullage basis, proceed as in 5.1.1. 

5.3 Net Measured Volume Before Movement — To obtain the net 
measured volume of oil in a tank before movement, deduct from the gross 
measured volume before movement as measured in 5.1, the volume of free 
water, sludge and sediment before movement as in 5.2. 

5.4 Net Volume of Clean Oil at Accepted Temperature Before 
Movement 

5.4.1 To obtain the net volume of clean oil at accepted temperature in 
a tank before movement, deduct from the net measured volume before 
movement obtained as in 5.3 the true water and sediment in suspension 
present in the oil. 

5.4.2 Where contracts make an allowance for suspended water and 
sediment, deduct from the net measured volume before movement the 



IS : 2164 - 1961 

difference between the true and the allowable quantity of suspended water 
and sediment. 

5.5 Gross Measured Volume After Movement — Use procedure similar 
to that prescribed in 5.1. 

5.6 Volume of Water, Sludge and Sediment After Movement — Use 

procedure similar to that described in 5.2. 

5.7 Net Measured Volume After Movement — Use procedure similar 
to that described in 5.3. 

5.8 Net Volume of Glean Oil at the Accepted Temperature After 
Movement — Use procedure similar to that described in 5.4. 

5.9 Net Volume of Glean Oil at Accepted Temperature, Received 
or Delivered — To obtain the net volume of clean oil at accepted tem- 
perature, received or delivered as a result of an oil movement, proceed as 
follows: 

a) Calculate the net volume of clean oil at accepted temperature 
before and after movement as described in 5.1 to 5.8 in respect of 
each oil container concerned in the oil movement. 

b) For each oil container concerned in the oil movement, determine 
the difference between the volume in the container before the 
oil movement and the volume in the container after the oil 
movement. 

c) When more than one container is involved in the oil movement, 
determine for all containers the algebraic sum of the quantities 
determined as in (b). 

6. CALCULATION OF VOLUME AT STANDARD REFERENCE 
TEMPERATURE 

6.1 Net Volume of Glean Oil at Standard Reference Temperature, 

6.1.1 Deduct from the volume obtained as in 5.9, the true water and 
sediment in suspension in the oil ( see 4.3.7 ). 

6.1.2 Calculate the net volume of oil at 15°C in a tank by multiplying 
the net measured volume of oil at accepted temperature obtained as 
in 6.1.1, by the voldme correction factor which corresponds to the accepted 
temperature and accepted density at I5°C (see 4.3.5 and 4.3.6 ). Obtain 
this factor from ASTM/IP Table No. 54. 

6.13 Where contracts make an allowance for suspended water and 
sediment, deduct from the volume obtained as in 6.1.1, the difference 

10 



IS : 2164 - 1961 

6.2 Net Volume of Glean Oil at Standard Reference Temperature 
After Movement — Use procedure similar to that described in 6.1. 

6.3 Net Volume of Clean Oil at Standard Reference Temperature, 
Received or Delivered — To obtain the net volume of clean oil at stan- 
dard reference temperature received or delivered as a result of an oil 
movement, proceed as follows: 

a) Calculate the net volumes of clean oil at standard reference tem- 
perature before and after movement for each container concerned 
in the oil movement. 

b) For each oil container concerned in the oil movement, determine 
the difference between the volume in the container before the oil 
movement and the volume in the container after the oil 
movement. 

c) When more than one container is involved in the oil movement, 
determine for all containers the algebraic sum of the quantities 
determined as in (b). 

7. CALCULATION OF VOLUME AT ACCEPTED TEMPERATURE 
(CASES OF TEMPERATURE DIFFERING BEFORE AND 
AFTER MOVEMENT ) 

7.1 Calculate as follows: 

a) Calculate the net volume of clean oil at standard reference 
temperature before movement as in 6. From this, calculate the net 
volume of the clean oil at the accepted temperature by the 
appropriate factor corresponding to that temperature as obtained 
from ASTM/IP Table No. 54. 

b) Calculate the net volume of clean oil after movement at accepted 
temperature as in (a). 

c) Determine the difference in quantities as obtained under (a) and 
(b). This will give the net quantity of clean oil received or 

7.2 To obtain the net total volume of the oil received or delivered from all 
the containers, take algebraic sum of the net oil received or delivered as 
the case may be for each container by the procedures as explained in 7.1. 

8. CALCULATION OF WEIGHT 

8.1 Oils Containing no Suspended Water and Sediment 

8.1.1 Weight of Clean Oil Before or After Movement — To obtain the weight 
of clean oil in a tank before or after movement, multiply the net volume of 
clean oil at standard reference temperature by the appropriate factor 

11 



IS: 2164 -1961 

?"ving weight per unit volume ( see ASTM/IP Petroleum Measurement 
ables ). 

8.2 Oil Containing Suspended Water and Sediment — Calculate the 
volume of wet oil at standard temperature, then multiply this volume by 
the factor giving weight per unit volume ( see ASTM/IP Petroleum 
Measurement Tables ) corresponding to the wet oil density at standard 
reference temperature. Calculate the true volume at standard reference 
temperature of suspended water and sediment in the tank. Assuming the 
suspended water and sediment to have a density at 15°C of 1*000 kg/1, 
calculate, using the appropriate ASTM/IP weight per unit volume factor, 
the weight of suspended water and sediment represented by the above 
determined volume at standard reference temperature. Deduct this weight 
of suspended water and sediment from the weight of wet oil. 

8.3 Weight of Clean Oil Received or Delivered — ' To obtain the 
weight of clean oil received or delivered as a result of an oil movement, 
proceed as follows: 

a) Calculate the weight of clean oil before the oil movement and 
after the oil movement for each container concerned in the oil 
movement. Then by difference between these two weights of 
clean oil, obtain the quantity of oil received or delivered for each 
container involved in oil movement. 

b) Determine the algebraic sum of the quantities as obtained in (a), 
for all the containers concerned. 

9. EXAMPLES OF NORMAL CALCULATIONS 

9.1 The following are some of the examples. 

9.1.1 Delivered Volume at the Observed Temperature Where Before Delivery and 
After Delivery Temperatures are Same — The following data and calculations 
illustrate the recommended procedure for determining the volume of 
gasoline at observed temperature delivered from a storage tank: 

a) Gauging Data Before Loading After Loading 
True gross dip 9-206 m 3112 m 
True water dip 0-070 m 0*070 m 
True average 26°C 26°C 

temperature 

b) Laboratory Data 

Average density 0-707 1 kg/1 0*707 1 kg/1 

at tank tern- at 26°C at 26°C 
perature 

Density at 15°C 0'716 3 kg/1 0-716 3 kg/1 



(ASTM/IP 
Table No. 53) 



12 



I$4 2164 - 1961 

c) Calculations Litres at 26°C 

Gross measured 13 809 000 4 668 000 

volume ( from 
tank calibra- 
tion table ) 

Volume of free 105 000 105 000 

water ( from 
tank calibra- 
tion table ) 

Net measured 13 704 000 4563 000 

volume 

There is no deduction for suspended water and sediment and the 
above net measured volumes, therefore, represent the net volumes of clean 
oil at observed temperature. 

The delivered volume of gasoline at observed temperature is, 
therefore: 

13 704 000 - 4 563 000 = 9 141 000 litres. 

9.2 Delivered Volume at Standard Temperature — The following 
calculations illustrate the recommended procedure for determining the 
volume of gasoline at 15 C C delivered during the movement quoted in 9.1. 

a) Gauging Data 

As given in 9.1 .1 (a) 

b) Laboratory Data 

As given in 9.1 .1 (b) 

c) Calculations Before Loading After Loading 
Net measured 13 704 000 4 563 000 

volume at accept- 
ed temperature 

[from 9.1.1 (c)], 

litres at 26°C 
Factor to re- 0-986 9 0'986 9 

duce volume to 

15°G (ASTM/IP 

Table No. 54 ) 
Net volume of 13 524 478 4 503 225 

clean oil, litres at 

15°G 

The net delivered volume at 15°C is, therefore: 

13 524 478 - 4 503 225 = 9 021 253 litres. 

13 



IS : 2164 - 1961 

9.3 Delivered Volume at Accepted Temperature Where 'Before 
Delivery' Temperature Differs from 'After Delivery* Tempera- 
ture — The following calculations illustrate the recommended procedure 
for determining volume of gasoline at accepted temperature when the 
' before delivery ' and ( after delivery ' temperatures are different: 



a) Gauging Data 


Before Loading 


After Loading 


True gross dip 


9-206 m 


3-H2 m 


True water dip 


0*070 m 


0-070 m 


True average 


26°C 


23°G 


temperature 






b) Laboratory Data 






Average density 


0-707 9 kg/I 


— 


at ! 26"°G 






Average density 


— 


0-710 8 kg/I 


at 23°C 






Density atl5°C 


0-716 3 kg j\ 


0-717 5 kg/1 


(ASTM/I P 






Table No. 53 ) 






c) Calculation of 


Litres at 


15°C 


JVet Volume of 






Clean Oil Deli- 






vered 






Gross measured 


13 809 000 


4 668 000 


volume ( from 






tank calibra- 






tion table ) 






Volume of free 


105 000 


105 000 


water ( from 






tank calibra- 






tion table ) 






Net measured 


13 704 000 


4 563 000 


volume 






Factor to reduce 


0-986 9 


0-990 5 


volume to 15°G 






(ASTM / I P 






Table No. 54 ) 






Net volume of 


13 524 478 


4 519 652 


clean oil at 






15°C 






The net volume of clean oil delivered at 15°C is, 


therefore: 


13 524 478- 


4 519 652 = 9 004 826 litres. 



When the before and after delivery temperatures differ, the accepted 
temperature shall be the weighted average of these two temperatures, the 

14 



IS : 2164 - 1961 

weightage being based on the estimated volumes of oil before and after its 
movement. 

d) Calculation of Accepted Temperature 

Net measured volume before delivery at 26 C C = 13 704 000 litres 
Net measured volume after delivery at 23°C = 4 563 000 litres 

Therefore, accepted temperature will be 

13 704 000 X 26 + 4 563 000 X 23 .„-„-,,, ,. ff + 
1 o o c7 nnn = 25-5°G ( by rounding off to 

18267000 -nearest 0-5-C) 

and, oil delivered at 25'5°C = -q?^ 8 ? 6 

= 9 118 811 litres. 
( Factor 0-987 5 obtained from ASTM/IP Table No. 54 ) 

9.4 Weight Received — The following data and calculations illustrate the 
jrecommended procedure for calculating the weight of oil received into an 
oil storage tank. In this example, it is assumed that the oil was received 
in accordance with a contract the terms of which allowed 0'20 percent 
water and sediment in suspension to be considered as ' clean oil \ 

a) Gauging Data Before Receipt After Receipt 
True gross dip 1-377 m 11-709 m 
True water dip 0'066 m 0-922 m 
True average 25'5°C 29-5°C 

temperature 

b) Laboratory Data 

Average density 0-866 5 kg/ 1 0-860 kg/ 1 

at tank tem- at 25-5°G at 29-5°G 

perature 
Average density 0-873 3 kg/1 0-869 4 kg/1 

at 15°C (from 

ASTM/IP Table 

No. 53 ) 
Suspended water 0*9 percent by 1 -3 percent by 

and sediment volume volume 

c) Calculations 4*25 -5°C At 29*5°G 

Gross measured I 435 938 litres 12 574 466 litres 

volume ( from 
tank calibration 
table ) 

Volume of free 70 982 litres 990 126 litres 

water ( from tank 
calibration 
table) 

15 



18:2164-1961 

Calculations — contd At 25*5°C At 29*5°C 

Net measured 1 364 956 litres 1 1 584 340 litres 

volume 
Factor to reduce 0-992 0988 8 

volume to 15 C C 

( ASTM / I P 

Table No. 54 ) 
Net volume of 1 354 036 litres 1 1 454 595 litres 

wet oil at 15°C 
Factor for con- 0-872 2 0'868 3 

verting to kilo- 
grams (ASTM/ 

IP Table No. 56 ) 
Weight of wet oil 1 180 990 kg 9 946 025 kg 

The weight of wet oil received is, therefore: 

9 946 025 -, 1 180 990 = 8 765 035 kg. 

9.4.1 Suspended Water and Sediment — From the percentage of 
suspended water and sediment given in 9.4 (b) the corresponding net 
volume of clean oil and suspended water and sediment at 15°C are: 

Before Receipt After Receipt 

Volume of clean oil 1 341 850 litres 1 1 305 685 litres 

at 15°G 
Volume of suspend- 1 2 1 86 litres 1 48 9 1 litres 

ed water and 

sediment at 15°C 

The net volume of clean oil at 15°C received is therefore: 
1 1 305 685 — 1 341 850 = 9 963 835 litres. 

Since the contract allows 0*2 percent water and sediment in suspen- 
sion to be considered as ' clean oil ', the net volume at 15°C of ' clean oil ' 
received will be 

- 963 »a 5 o X 10 - = 9 98 3 803 litres at 15°C 
yy'o 

and the volume of suspended water and sediment which can be included as 
' clean oil * is 9 983 803 - 9 963 835 or 19 968 litres at 15°G. 

The volume at 15°G of suspended water and sediment in the tank 
after" the oil movement shall be reduced by this amount and is now 
148 910 — 19 968 = 128 942 litres at 15°C. 

The increase ( under the terms of contract ) in suspended water and 
sediment in the tank as a result of oil movement is, therefore; 
128 942 - 12 186 = 116 756 litres at 15°G. 

16 



IS : 2164 - 1961 

Assuming the density at 15°C of the suspended water and sediment 
to be 1*000 kg/1 the factor for converting this to kilograms (ASTM/IP 
Table No. 56 ) is 0*998 9 and the weight of suspended water and sediment 
which has been added to that in the tank before the oil movement is: 

116 756 x 0*998 9= 116 628 kg 

The weight of * clean ' oil received under the terms of the contract is, 
therefore: 

8 765 035 - 1 16 628 = 8 648 407 kg = 8 648*407 tonnes. 

SECTION II METHOD FOR SPECIAL CALCULATIONS 

10. GENERAL 

10.0 The special calculations and modifications to the normal calculations 
. specified in Section I, necessary when dealing with products under certain 

given conditions, are given in this section. 

10.1 Liquids in Tanks with Uncalibrated Irregular Bottoms — If 

the oil or water dip in a tank is below the first entry in the calibration 
table, dips shall be taken at all the dip hatches, and an average dip calcu- 
lated as described in 4.3.2. The quantity represented by this average dip 
is then calculated using the litres per centimetre at the first entry in the 
tank calibration table. 

10.2 Tank Bottom Movement 

10.2.1 The overall height of the dip hatch above the bottom datum 
point in a tank may change owing to tank bottom movement. This change 
will not normally affect the calculation of any quantity of oil in a tank or 
quantity of oil moved, if the datum point is fully covered by the oil or water 
before and after movement. 

10.2.2 Where an incomplete water bottom or no water bottom exists or 
the oil level is below the datum point, as shown by dips taken at all the 
dip hatches on the tank, both gross dips and water dips, if any, shall be 
averaged before entering the tank calibration table. The method of ave- 
raging these dips is the same as that given in 4.3.2. The quantities repre- 
sented by these dips are read from the calibration table and taken for 
further calculations. 

10.3 Liquid in Pipelines — For the purpose of calculating the quan- 
tity of oil contained in them, pipelines shall be regarded as separate 
containers. The total capacity of the pipeline shall be calculated by a 
sound mathematical method, or by means of tables giving the capacity per 
unit length. In calculating the total quantity of an oil movement, the 
difference in the quantities contained in the pipelines before and after the 

17 



IS: 2164- 1961 

movement is added to or subtracted from quantities received into or deli- 
vered from the tanks, as the case may be. For stock quantity purposes, 
the quantities contained in the pipelines are added to the relevant stock in 
the tank or tanks. 

10.4 Liquid in Floating Roof Tanks 

10.4.1 When the roof is freely floating, a quantity equivalent to the roof 
displacement should be deducted from the measured quantity corresponding 
to the gauge taken. 

The following formula may be used to calculate the quantity equiva- 
lent to the roof displacement: 

W 

where 

(£=, volume in litres equivalent to the roof displacement, 

P = kilograms per litre of product at standard reference tem- 
perature. 

10.4.2 When the roof is not in a freely floating position the proportionate 
fractional displacement due to the floating roof is to be deducted from the 
measured volume. This displacement will be obtained from the supple- 
mentary tables provided with the tank calibration tables. Since this cannot 
be calculated accurately, it is suggested to keep the roof always in a 
floating position. 

10.4.3 Where the oil level is low and does not touch the roof, no 
deduction is to be made for the roof weight, as the roof rests on its 
supports. 

10.4.4 The following example illustrates the recommended procedure for 
calculating the quantity: 

Data 

True gross dip 8*106 m 

True water dip 0*082 m 

Temperature of oil in tank 26°C 

Density of oil in tank 0*715 kg/1 at 24°C 

Weight of floating roof 85 214 kg 

Calculations 

Gross measured volume cor- 8 916 600 litres 

responding to the dip 

18 



18:2164.1961 

Volume of free water 90 200 litres 

Density of oil at 15°C 0-722 5 kg/I 

(ASTM/IPTableNo.53) 

Factor to reduce volume to 0*987 1 

15°C (ASTM/IP Table 
No. 54 ) 

Net measured volume at 26°G 8 826 400 litres 

( before accounting for 
roof displacement ) 

Net measured volume at 8 826 400 x 0-987 1 

15°C ( before accounting = 8 712 539 litres 

for roof displacement ) 

Factor giving kilograms per 0*721 4 

litre for density at 15°G 
(ASTM/IP Table No. 56) 

Volume of oil equivalent to 85 214 -•- 0*721 4 

roof displacement =118 123 litres at 15°C 

Therefore, net volume of oil 8 712 539 — 118 123 

is = 8 594 416 litres at 15°G 

To calculate the net volume of oil at accepted temperature of 26°C, 
divide the net volume of oil at 15°C by the factor 0*987 1 obtained from 
ASTM/IP Table No. 54. That is, net volume of oil is 8 594 416 — 
0-987 1 = 8 706 732 litres at 26°C. 

To calculate the weight of oil, multiply the net volume of oil at 15°G 
by the factor 0'721 4 obtained from ASTM/IP Table No. 56. That is, the 
weight of oil is 8 594 416 x 0-721 4 = 6 200 012 kg 

= 6 20001 2 tonnes. 

Alternative method 

Proceed in a similar way as the above example to get: 

Net measured volume at 15°G 8 712 539 litres 

(before accounting for 
roof displacement ) 

Factor giving kilograms per 0-721 4 

litre for density at 15°G 
(ASTM/IP Table No. 56) 

Therefore, weight of oil = ( 8 712 539 X 0*721 4 ) - 85 214 kg 
= 6 200*012 tonnes. 

19 



IS : 2164 - 1961 

If net volume of oil at 15°C is required, then divide the weight of oil 
by the factor giving kilograms per litre for density at 15°G (ASTM/IP 
Table No. 56 ). That is, net volume of oil is 6 200 012 -f- 0'721 4 = 
8 594 416 litres at 15°C. 

If net volume of oil at observed temperature of 26°C is required, then 
divide the net volume of oil at 15 C G by the factor 0-987 1 obtained from 
ASTM/IP Table No. 54. 

Therefore, net volume of oil is 8 594 416 -f- 0'987 1 = 8 706 732 litres 
at 26°C, 

Note — During normal conditions, the roof remains in the floating position before 
and after any oil movement. Therefore, for any delivery or receipt, the corrections for 
the weight of the oil displaced by the roof need not be made because it is the same 
before and after the oil movement. However, this does not apply in calculation of the 
volume of oil received or delivered, because there might be a change of gravity before 
and after the oil movement. 

10.5 Liquids Under High Pressure — Liquids under high pressure, for 
example propane, butane, etc, usually termed liquefied petroleum 
gases, are normally dealt with in relatively small bulk quantities. Railcar 
quantities, for example, are often involved, and in such cases it is usually 
possible to employ methods of direct weighing. When it is required 
to take into account the vapour contained in the space above the liquid, the 
gauger will be called upon to report the temperature and gauge pressure of 
this vapour space, in addition to the normal measurements reported. 
It should be noted that in cases of direct weighing, vapour quantities 
are included in the weights which are weights in vacuum because with 
a closed container the volume of air displaced is the same before and after 
the oil movement. 

10.5.1 Calculation of Volume at Standard Reference Temperature 

10.5.1.1 When quantities concerned have been directly weighed, 
divide the weights by the density at standard reference temperature. 

10.5.1.2 When the quantities cannot be directly weighed, volumes 
at standard reference temperature shall be determined as follows: 

a) Carry out such portions of the procedure specified in 6, as are ap- 
plicable. 

b) Where the vapour contained in the vapour space above the liquid 
has to be accounted for, calculate the liquid equivalent at 
standard reference temperature of such vapour by first reducing 
the volume of vapour from its volume at given tempera- 
ture and gauge pressure to its equivalent volume at standard 
reference temperature and zero gauge pressure, and then apply an 
appropriate gas volume to liquid volume ratio. This ratio 
may be obtained from the table in Appendix B. In the case 
of normal commercial blends of liquefied petroleum gases ( LPG ), 



IS : 2164 - 1961 

the ratio shall be calculated by taking the mean of the values 
given for the appropriate pure components weighted for the moie 
fraction present in the liquid as shown by an analysis. 

Note — Liquefied petroleum gases referred to commercially as ' propane or butane * 
are blends containing varying proportions of saturated and unsaturated C, and G4 with 
smaller quantities of the lighter and heavier hydrocarbons, although ' propane ' consists 
principally of C^'s and ' butane ' of C^s. 

10.5.1.3 Hydrocarbon vapours at or near saturation do not follow the 
ideal gas laws and the composition of the vapour in equilibrium with 
the liquid will vary with temperature, and will differ from that of the liquid. 
The calculations involved in the accurate determination oi' an appropriate 
vapour/liquid ratio are, therefore, complicated. However, for normal 
calculations involved in the commercial measurement of liquefied petro- 
leum gases, it is recommended that the procedure in 10.5.1.2 (b) should be 
followed. 

10.5.2 Calculation of Weights — When the quantities cannot beVdirectly 
weighed, weights shall be determined as follows: 

a) Determine volumes at standard temperature by the procedure 
specified in 10.5.1.2 making allowance tor vapour quantities 
where this is required. 

b) Multiply volumes at standard reference temperature by the 
applicable factors giving weight per unit volume contained in the 
appropriate ASTM/IP tables. 

10.5.3 Calculation of Volume at Accepted Temperature 

10.5.3.1 When the quantities have been directly weighed, volumes at 
accepted temperature shall be determined as follows: 

a) Determine volumes at standard reference temperature by the 
procedure specified in 10.5.1*1. 

b) Divide volumes at standard temperature by the applicable factors 
for reducing volumes at observed temperature to volumes at 
standard reference temperature obtained from the appropriate 
ASTM/IP tables, having due regard to the temperature and 
densities at standard temperature of the quantities involved. 

10.5.3.2 When quantities cannot be directly weighed, volumes 
at accepted temperature shall be determined as follows: 

a) Carry out such portions of the procedure specified in 5 as are ap- 
plicable. 

b) When the vapour contained in the vapour space above the 
liquid has to be accounted for, calculate the liquid equivalent of 
the vapour at the temperature of the liquid above which the 
vapour lies by suitable adaptation of the procedure given 
in 10.5.1.2 (b). 

21 



IS: 2164- 1961 

c) When applicable, treat the vapour space calculations carried out 
as specified in 10.5.3.2 (b) as for separate containers and add 
the net results of such calculation to those obtained in (a) above. 

103.4 Volatile Liquids in Vapour-Tight Storage 

10.5.4.1 The quantities of volatile products stored in vapour-tight 
containers shall be calculated as described in Section I, unless a container 
is gauged through a dip pipe. When a measurement is so taken, 
the gauger will report the pressure in the vapour space of the container as 
shown on the manometer fitted to the container, in addition to other 
relevant particulars. The observed dip shall first be corrected to the true 
dip of the oil in the container as follows: 

a) Multiply the observed manometer reading by the density of 
the liquid in the manometer, and divide the result by the density 
of the oil in the tank. 

b) Subtract the result obtained in (a) from the observed dip reading 
when the pressure in the vapour space of the container is above 
atmospheric; add the result when the pressure is below 
atmospheric. This gives the true dip reading which is taken 
into further calculation as in Section I. 

10.5.4.2 In calculating the dip corrections outlined above, it shall be 
noted that the densities of both the manometer liquid and the oil in the 
container are required at the temperatures obtained at the time of 
measurement. These densities can be determined from the corresponding 
densities at standard reference temperature by means of appropriate 
ASTM/IP measurement tables for petroleum oils and International critical 
tables for other manometric fluids. 

Examples: 

Dip ( through dip pipe ) 7-358 m 

Observed manometer reading —0*044 m 

Temperature of oil in tank 29°C 

Temperature of manometric liquid 25°C 

Density of oil in tank at 15°C 0*718 6 kg/J 

Density of manometric liquid (glycerine) 1'26 kg/1 
at0°C 

Calculations 

Density of oil in tank at 29°C = 0*706 9 kg/1 
( According to ASTM/IP Table No. 53 ). 

22 



IS: 2164- 1961 

♦Density of manometric 
liquid at 25°C = 1-26 - ( 25 x 0-000 64 ) 

= 1-244 kg/1 

0*044 x 1*244 
Therefore, correction to dip ( to be added ) = — Q . 7Qfi ~ — 

= 0-077 m 
Corrected dip = 7*358 + 0-077 = 7*435 m 

If the pressure had been more than atmospheric ( positive ) it would 
have been necessary to subtract the correction from the dip readirig. 

10.5.5 Examples of Calculation of Liquid Equivalents of Light Hydrocarbon 
Gases — The following are the two typical examples. 

10.5.5.1 Calculation of liquid equivalent at standard reference temperature 

Example'. 

The vapour space above the liquid level in a storage tank 
containing propane is known to have a capacity of 44 800 litres at 
the time of gauging. If the temperature of the vapour is 23°C and 
the gauge pressure is 81 kg/cm 2 , what is the liquid equivalent of the 
vapour in litres at 15°C ? 

The vapour shall first be reduced to * V* litres at zero gauge 
pressure and 15°C. 

Applying the formula 

P i X V x _ P 3 x V t 

r x ~ r a 

We have 

P x = (8*10 + 1*033 5) kg /cm 3 absolute 

V x = 44 800 litres 

T, = ( 23 + 273 )°K 

p 2 = ( + 1-033 5 ) kg /cm 2 absolute 

T s = ( 15 -f 273 )°K 

V t = the required volume in litres at 15°G 



•Density correction: 

Cubical expansion of glycerine is 0*000 505. 

' Ref Handbook of Chemistry and Physics by C. D. Hodgman & Others). 

Therefore, change of density of glycerine per deg C 



^(^-T^w)- ' 00064 - 



Density correction for temperature may be obtained also from International critical 
tables. 

23 



IS j 2164 - 1961 

Then 



T x P 
9-133 5 x 448 00 x 288 

296 x 1-033 5 
117 844 070-4 



305-916 
= 385 217 litres at 15°G 

The gas volume/liquid volume ratio for propane is 272*7, and 
the equivalent volume of liquid propane is, therefore 

385 217 , .,_ ,. ,,/,>-! 

272 , 7 or 1 413 litres at 15°C. 

10.5.5.2 Calculation of liquid equivalent at observed temperature 
Example 1: 

In the conditions given in example under 10.5.5.1, what is 
the liquid equivalent of the vapour in litres at 21"5°C ? 

Proceeding as in example under 10.5.5.1, we have P u P 2) V^ 
and Tj, as before, and 7" 2 = ( 21'5 + 273 )°K (on absolute 
scale). Then V 2 , the required volume in litres at 21*5°C > is 
given by 

T/ 9-133 5 x 44 800 x 294-5 „ no ft1| ,. 

V % = 2 jfc-xT0335 ~ 393 9U htreS at 2l ' 5 C 

The equivalent volume of liquid propane is, therefore 
393 911 
272-7 = l 444 litres at 21 ' 5 ° C - 

Example 2: 

Consider the example under 10.5,5.1 with the following 
composition of the vapour: 

Propane 20 percent by weight 

Zwbutane 30 „ „' „ 

n-butane 50 „ „ „ 

Calculations 

From the above analysis the mol percent will be calculated 
as follows: 

mol percent 
Propane = 20/44 = 0-454 5 mol 24-8 

Isobutane = 30/58 = 0*517 2 „ 28-2 

n-butane = 50/58 = 0-862 1 „ 47*0 

1-833 8 „ 100*0 

24 



IS: 2164- 1961 

Therefore, the gas volume /liquid volume ratio for the 

24-8 x 272-7 + 282 x 229-3 + 470 x 2378 
vapour will be = j^r 

= 244-05B 

And the equivalent volume of liquid of the mixed com- 
ponent will be = 385 2 1 7 /244-058 

= 1 578-383 litres at 15°C. 

10.5.6 Blends of Petroleum and Non-petroleum Products 

10.5.6.1 The basic procedure for the calculation of quantities of 
blends of petroleum and non-petroleum products is that given in 
Section I. 

10.5.6.2 If the proportions of the petroleum and non-petroleum 
components of the blend are unknown, follow the procedure given in 
Section I, as for petroleum products. This procedure will result in 
quantity figures of doubtful accuracy and shall only be adopted when it 
is impossible to obtain even an approximate idea of the amount of non- 
petroleum products present in the blend. 

10.5.6.3 Where the proportions of the petroleum and non-petroleum 
components of the blend are known, follow the procedure given in 
Section I with the following modifications: 

a) The coefficients of change of density with temperature 
given in Appendices C and D will be found more convenient 
than the corresponding ASTM/IP density correction tables, 
and 

b) The volume correction coefficients given in Appendices E and F 
will also be found more easily applicable than the corresponding 
ASTM/IP volume reduction tables. The appropriate volume 
reduction coefficient is calculated by proportion from the 
coefficients of the two components according to the percentage 
by volume of each present, 

Example: 

70 000 litres at 25°C of a 10 percent by volume benzole 
blend with gasoline have a density at 15 C C of 0-740 1 kg/1. 
The densities at 15°C of the benzole and gasoline are 0"869 5 
and 0-725 kg/1 respectively. The volume at 15°C and the 
weight of the blend are required. 

Calculation of volume at 15°C 

Volume correction coefficient per deg C for benzole 
= 0-001 13 ( see Appendix E ) 

Volume correction coefficient per deg C for gasoline 
= 0-001 17 {see Appendix D) 

25 



£5:2164-1961 



Therefore, the volume correction coefficient per deg C for 
blend = 10 percent of 0*001 13 + 90 percent of 0-001 17 
= 0*001 166 

The volume of oil is to be reduced over 10°G ( from 25°C 
to 15°C) 

Therefore, reduction of = 0*001 166 x 10 

unit volume =0*011 66 

Reduction of 70 000 litres = 70 000 x 0*01 1 66 

= 816*2 litres 
and, volume at 15°C = 70 000 - 816*2 

= 69 183*8 litres 
= 69 184 ( after rounding off 
to litre ) 

Calculation of weight 

Calculation of weight is the same as in the procedure outlined in 
Section I, using appropriate ASTM/IP weight/volume tables, 
entered with the density at 1 5°G. 

One litre at 15°G of an oil whose density at 15°G is 0*740 1 kg/1 
weighs 0-739 kg in air ( ASTM/IP Table No. 56 ). 

Therefore, 69 184 litres at 15°C will weigh 69 184 x 0*739 kg 

= 51 126*98 kg 
= 51 127 kg 
= 51*127 tonnes 



APPENDIX A 

{Clause 0.3.1) 

A SHORT METHOD OF WEIGHT CALCULATION FOR 
SMALL QUANTITIES 

A-l. METHOD 

A-l.l The method prescribed is simple in as far as the use of ASTM/IP 
petroleum measurement tables is avoided. It can be relied upon to give 
results correct to two places of decimal of a tonne and is intended 
primarily for the calculation of weights of furnace oil and light diesel oil 
moved in tank carts, tank lorries and rail tank wagons. 

A-2. CORRECTION COEFFICIENTS 

A-2.1 If a sample is drawn from a tank lorry, tank wagon, etc, for deter- 
mination of density, and the temperature of the sample differs by more 

26 



IS: 2164 -1961 

than 0*5°C from that of the oil in the tank lorry, tank wagon, etc, the 

sample density may be corrected to the temperature of the oil in the 

tank lorry, tank wagon, etc, using the following density correction co- 
efficients: 

Furnace oil 0*000 63 per deg C 

Light diesel oil 0-000 65 per deg C 

A-3. CALCULATION 

A-3.1 The following formula may be used for the calculation of weights 
of small parcels carried in tank carts, tank lorries and rail tank wagons: 

AA, • l • V(D-F) 

Weight in tonnes = — v . (tftf , — - 

where 

V = volume in litres of oil at temperature T°C, 

D = density of oil measured with a density hydrometer 
calibrated at 15 C C, and 

F = factor for converting weight in vacuum to weight in air. 
= 0-000 02 ( 40 + T ) where T is in °C. 
= 0-001 1 (at 15°C). 

A-4. EXAMPLE 

A-*4.1 The following example illustrates the use of this short method: 

A rail tank wagon contains 20 000 litres of furnace oil at a 
temperature of 29°C. A sample drawn from the tank wagon was 
found to have a density of 0*924 5 at a temperature of 28 , 5°C. To 
determine the weight of the oil in the tank wagon: 

Data 

Density at 28*5°C = 0-924 5 kg/1 

Density correction coefficient = 0*000 63 per deg C 

Therefore density at 29°C = 0*924 5 - 0*000 3 

■= 0-924 2 kg/1 

Factor F = 0*000 02 ( 40 + 29 ) 

= 0*001 38 



= 0001 4 



27 



IS: 2164- 1961 

rp. r . . . . 20 000 ( 0-924 2 - 0-001 4 ) 
1 neretore weight in tonnes = — v i ' f inn 

= 18*46 tonnes ( correct to 2 places 
of decimals ) 

A-4.1.1 The values of F for temperatures from 5°G to 40°C, in steps of 
5°C, are given below for ready reference: 



r°c 


F 


r°c 


F 


5 


0-000 9 


25 


0*001 3 


10 


0*001 


30 


0001 4 


15 


0*001 1 


35 


0*001 5 


20 


0-001 2 


40 


0-001 6 



APPENDIX B 

[Clause 10.5.1.2(b) ] 

GAS VOLUME/LIQUID VOLUME RATIOS 

(Taken from Natural Gasoline Association of America Standard 2145 ) 



Note- 



Propane 


272-7 


/robutane 


229*3 


n-butane 


237*8 


Zropentane 


205*0 


n-pentane 


207*0 


These ratios are independent of the units used. 


28 





IS: 2164 -1961 

APPENDIX C 

[ Clause 10.5.6.3 (a) ] 

TEMPERATURE CORRECTION COEFFICIENTS PER 

DEGREE CENTIGRADE FOR DENSITIES DETERMINED IN 

GLASS APPARATUS 

( To be used only for Blends of Petroleum with 
Non-petroleum Products) 



Density 


Correction 


Density 


Correction 


AT 15' 


5 c, 


g/ml 


Coefficient 
per deg C 


at 15 


°C, g/ml 


Coefficient 
per dcg C 


0-596 7 


to 


0-604 9 


0-001 03 


0-742 2 


to 0-753 4 


0-000 79 


0-605 


,, 


0-613 3 


0001 01 


0-753 5 


„ 0-764 6 


0000 77 


0-613 4 


,, 


0-621 9 


0000 99 


0-764 7 


„ 0-775 7 


0-000 76 


0-622 


5? 


0-631 9 


0-000 97 


0-775 8 


„ 0-786 6 


0000 74 


0-632 


3) 


0-6418 


0000 95 


0-786 7 


„ 0-798 4 


0-000 72 


0-641 9 


»3 


0-652 9 


0000 94 


0-798 5 


„ 0-802 


0000 70 


0-653 


>? 


0-664 8 


0000 92 


0-802 1 


„ 0-827 9 


0000 68 


0-664 9 


>5 


0-677 3 


0-000 90 


0-828 


„ 0-859 4 


0-000 67 


0-677 4 


5J 


0-689 7 


0000 88 


0-859 5 


„ 0-924 5 


0-000 65 


0-689 8 


?? 


0-702 3 


0-000 86 


0-924 6 


„ 1-024 3 


0-000 63 


0-702 4 


?J 


0-716 4 


0000 85 


1024 4 


„ 1-074 2 


0000 61 


0-716 5 


55 


0-729 8 


0-000 83 


1-074 3 


„ 1-124 1 


0-000 59 


0-729 9 


>5 


0-742 1 


0-000 81 









APPENDIX D 

[ Clause 10.5.6.3 (a) j 

TEMPERATURE CORRECTION COEFFICIENTS PER 

DEGREE CENTIGRADE FOR DENSITIES DETERMINED IN 

GLASS APPARATUS 

( Coal Tar Distillation Products and Alcohols') 



Product 


Correction 


Product 


Correction 




Coefficient 




Coefficient 




per deg C 




per deg C 


Benzene 


0-001 03 


Heavy solvent naphtha 


0-000 77 


Benzole ( commercial ) 


0-000 97 


Creosote oil 


0-W0 74 


Toluole 


0-000 88 


Coal tar 


0-000 61 


Xvlole 


0-000 85 


Methyl alcohol 


000 90 


Solvent naphtha 


0-000 83 


Ethyl alcohol 


0-000 79 



29 



IS : 2164 . 1961 

APPENDIX E 
[ Clause 10.5.6.3 (b) ] 

VOLUME CORRECTION COEFFICIENTS OF PETROLEUM 

PRODUCTS 

( To be used only for Blends of Petroleum with 
Non-petroleum Products ) 



Density 


Volume Correction 


Density 


Volume Correction 


at 15°C, 


.kg/I 


Coefficient 


at 15 


>°C 


,kg/l 


Coefficient 








per deg C 








per deg C 


0-599 4 


to 


0-602 2 


0-001 73 


0-741 6 


to 


0-746 8 


0-001 10 


0-602 3 


99 


0-605 3 


0-001 71 


0-746 9 




0-752 


000108 


0-605 4 


>> 


0-608 2 


0001 69 


0-752 1 




0-757 1 


000106 


0-608 3 


99 


0-6112 


0001 67 


0-757 2 




0-761 8 


000104 


0-6113 


99 


0-614 4 


0-00166 


0-761 9 


99 


0-7668 


0001 03 


0-614 5 


>» 


0-617 6 


000164 


0-766 9 




0-772 1 


0001 01 


0-617 7 


99 


0-621 1 


0-001 62 


0-772 2 


99 


0-777 3 


0000 99 


0-621 2 


»» 


0-623 9 


000160 


0-777 4 




0-782 9 


0000 97 


0-624 


99 


0-626 9 


000158 


0-783 




0-789 


0000 95 


0-627 


»J 


0-629 8 


0-001 57 


0-789 1 


99 


0-794 5 


0000 94 


0-629 9 


99 


0-633 5 


0-001 55 


0-794 6 




0-800 2 


0000 92 


0-633 6 


99 


0-636 7 


0001 53 


0-800 3 




0-807 


0-000 90 


0-6368 


99 


0-640 


0-001 51 


0-807 1 




0-815 4 


0000 88 


0*6401 


99 


0-643 2 


0-001 49 


0-815 5 


99 


0-824 


000086 


0-643 3 


99 


0-646 5 


000148 


0-824 1 


99 


0-832 5 


0000 85 


0-646 6 


99 


0-650 5 


000146 


0-832 6 




0-841 9 


0000 83 


0-650 6 


99 


0-653 8 


0-00144 


0-842 


99 


0-851 4 


0000 81 


0-653 9 


9) 


0-658 1 


0-001 42 


0-851 5 




0-862 1 


0000 79 


0-658 2 


99 


0-663 3 


000140 


0-862 2 


>f 


0-874 3 


0000 77 


0-663 4 


99 


0-667 6 


0001 39 


0-874 4 


99 


0-890 3 


0000 76 


0-667 7 


» 


0-671 8 


0-001 37 


0-890 4 




0-907 3 


0-000 74 


0-671 9 


99 


0-676 4 


0-001 35 


0-907 4 


ft 


0-929 9 


0-000 72 


0-676 5 


99 


0-680 8 


0001 33 


0-930 


99 


0-951 7 


0000 70 


0-680 9 


99 


0-684 7 


0001 31 


0-951 8 


99 


0-974 9 


0-000-68 


0-684 8 


91 


0-690 


0001 30 


0-975 


99 


0-999 4 


0000 67 


0-690 1 
0-695 7 


99 


0-695 6 


0001 28 


0-999 5 


'99 


1017 8 


0-000 65 


99 


0-700 5 


0001 26 


1017 9 


99 


1036 9 


0000 63 


0-700 6 


99 


0-705 2 


0-001 24 


1037 




1054 5 


0000 61 


0-705 3 


99 


0-710 6 


0001 22 


10546 


99 


1-075 2 


0-000 59 


0-710 7 


99 


0-715 9 


000121 


1075 3 


99 


1124 9 


0000 58 


0-716 


99 


0-721 


0-001 19 










0-721 1 


99 


0-726 


0-001 17 










0-726 1 


99 


0-731 3 


0-001 15 










0-731 4 


99 


0-736 4 


0001 13 










0-7365 


99 


0-741 5 


0001 12 











30 



IS: 2164- 1961 
APPENDIX F 

[ Clause 10.5.6.3 (b) ] 

VOLUME CORRECTION COEFFICIENTS OF NON- 
PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 



Product 


Coefficient per deg C 


Benzene 


0-001 24 


Benzole ( commercial ) 


0*001 13 


Toluple 


0-00104 


Xylole 


0-00100 


Solvent naphtha 


0-000 99 


Heavy solvent naphtha 


0-000 92 


Creosote oil 


0-000 73 


Coal tar 


0000 54 


Methyl alcohol 


0-001 18 


Ethyl alcohol 


0-00108 



31 



BUREAU OF INDIAN STANDARDS 

Headquarters: 

Manak Bhavan, 9 Bahadur Shah Zafar Marg, NEW DELHI 110002 

Telephones: 323 01 31 , 323 3375, 323 9402 

Fax : 91 11 3234062, 91 11 3239399, 91 11 3239382 

Telegrams : Manaksanstha 

(Common to all Offices) 

Central Laboratory: Telephone 

Plot No. 20/9, Site IV, Sahibabad Industrial Area, Sahibabad 201010 8-77 0032 

Regional Offices: 

Central : Manak Bhavan, 9 Bahadur Shah Zafar Marg, NEW DELHI 1 10002 323 76 17 

"Eastern : 1/14 CIT Scheme VII M, V.I. P. Road, Maniktola, CALCUTTA 700054 337 86 62 

Northern : SCO 335-336, Sector 34-A, CHANDIGARH 160022 60 38 43 

Southern : C.I.T. Campus, IV Cross Road, CHENNAI 600113 235 23 15 

tWestern : Manakalaya, E9, Behind Marol Telephone Exchange, Andheri (East), 832 92 95 
MUMBAI 400093 

Branch Offices: 

'Pushpak', Nurmohamed Shaikh Marg, Khanpur, AHMEDABAD 380001 550 13 48 

tPeenya Industrial Area, 1st Stage, Bangalore-Tumkur Road 839 49 55 
BANGALORE 560058 

Gahgotri Complex, 5th Floor, Bhadbhada Road, T.T. Nagar, BHOPAL 462003 55 40 21 

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Kalaikathir Buildings, 670 Avinashi Road, COIMBATORE 641037 21 01 41 

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Savitri Complex, 116 G.T. Road, GHAZIABAD 201001 8-71 19 96 

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5-8-56C, L.N. Gupta Marg, Nampally Station Road, HYDERABAD 500001 20 1 83 

E-52, Chitaranjan Marg, C-Scheme, JAIPUR 302001 37 29 25 

1 1 7/418 B, Sarvodaya Nagar, KANPUR 208005 21 68 76 

Seth Bhawan, 2nd Floor, Behind Leela Cinema, Naval Kishore Road, 23 89 23 
LUCKNOW 226001 

NIT Building, Second Floor, Gokulpat Market, NAGPUR 440010 52 51 71 

Patliputra Industrial Estate, PATNA 800013 26 23 05 

Institution of Engineers (India) Building 1332 Shjvaji Nagar, PUNE 41 1005 32 36 35 

TO No. 14/1421, University P.O. Palayam, THIRUVANANTHAPURAM 695034 6 21 17 



"Sales Office is at 5 Chovyringhee Approach, P.O. Princep Street, 27 10 85 

CALCUTTA 700072 

fSales Office is at Novelty Chambers, Grant Road, MUMBAI 400007 309 65 28 

tSales Office is at 'F' Block, Unity Building, Narashimaraja Square, 222 39 71 

BANGALORE 560002 



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